A bunch of rebellious Republicans who want to blow up the system



What really unites the 20 rogue Republicans who have held the Capitol hostage in this turbulent start to the political season is their willingness to blow up the status quo. It is enough to listen to their passionate interjections in the hall and their fiery clamor in the corridors: Washington is broken, the political system must be reformed, the people must prevail over the elites, nothing more than the same. They are a bunch of rebels, the “infidels,” as their party colleagues call them, who act like genuine anti-regime. So much so that the United States, thanks to its indifference to party discipline, for the first time in a century does not have a Speaker of the House, a position crucial to laws and budgets, and the Speaker’s second in a row. Parliament. The nation. The 20 lawmakers who declined to vote for their party’s leader come from conservative constituencies where Democrats usually have no choice. Related News Standard No. Kevin McCarthy also loses the seventh vote to be House Leader David Alandet Not even the intervention of former President Donald Trump, who Wednesday publicly asked his party to support him, has served the Republicans to secure victory. They are mostly ardent supporters of former President Donald. Trump, though, is not just that. Many of them are active in a small parliamentary group known as the Freedom Bloc, which is famous for its populist and liberal approaches. Among this result, he announced that four enemies of Republican leader Kevin McCarthy, and since the party’s victory in the House of Representatives elections in November, have advanced that their vote will be “no.” Under normal circumstances, with a comfortable majority, that wouldn’t be a problem. But in that election, the Republicans barely had a 10-vote majority, and this recalcitrant segment managed to convince enough of their caucuses to sell the blockade. For weeks, McCarthy has been courting them, but he’s also trying to keep the rest of the party happy, 222 in a House of 435, where every vote will matter more than in previous legislatures. There are veterans among the rebels, like Matt Gaetz, of Florida, a born agitator who has turned bravado into political art (during the pandemic he stood in the room wearing the mask used in chemical attacks) and who has been charged and investigated, though not convicted, for having relations with a minor. And there are upstarts, like Ana Paulina Luna, also of Florida, who won her first election professing her admiration for Donald Trump and gun ownership, which has been presented as the Republican’s answer to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Among the objects given to be photographed with weapons of all sizes is Lauren Boebert, who ran a closer election in her Colorado district than she expected, and who has come under fire for claiming that one House member, Ilhan Omar, is a terrorism suspect. for being a Muslim, among other controversies. African Americans all vote, one after another, for different candidates. At one point, they rallied behind one of their fellow rebels, a young Florida man named Byron Donalds. This was historical because Donalds is black and therefore the candidate chosen by the Democrats – Hakeem Jeffries of New York – and one of the Republicans – Donalds – were African American. To date, almost everyone who has held the office has been white, and only one of the 52 has been a woman, the latest being Nancy Pelosi. What did the Republican rebels ask about McCarthy? A series of concessions in the distribution of fees and other concessions. Vote to determine the term, which is the backbone of populism. And the most insulting to the Republican leader, who puts his power, if he succeeds, at stake: the possibility that any deputy, only one, will be able to introduce a motion of confidence, which will force him to submit permanently to the dictates of this cluster.

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